Faces of Lobster Country

At the end of the pier in St. Andrews-by-the-Sea we are reminded that the economy lives by the tide here by the Bay of Fundy.

At the end of the pier in St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, we are reminded that the economy lives by the tide here by the Bay of Fundy.

by cheri

The border guards let us into Canada after stiff questioning.

Once here, we hatched our devious plan: eat as much lobster as we possibly can in the four days in New Brunswick and marvel at the extreme tide patterns (which I will address in a future blog post).

It wasn’t long before I determined that New Brunswick can compete with California in the craziness category. Here are some photos with captions to explain the scene (if possible).

Three kids in St. Andrews who were traveling with their grandparents. They told me their grandparents were worried about losing them.

Three kids in St. Andrews  were traveling with their grandparents. They told me their grandparents were worried about losing them.

The locals in St. Andrews encouraged us to visit one of Canada’s loveliest gardens, the Kingsbrae Gardens. The 27 acres are lush and diverse, but I thought I’d entertain you with the sculpture garden.

Through the archway we go into one of 34 different gardens and themes.

Through the archway we go into one of 34 different gardens and themes.

image

image

The stallion thrust his front hooves forward as if to say,

The stallion thrust his front hooves forward as if to say, ” I know I am stuck in a flower garden, but look at me.”

image

The sculptures tickled me silly. Can we see anything else in New Brunswick as entertaining?

The sculptures tickled me silly. Can we see anything else in New Brunswick as entertaining?

The answer to that question we found in Saint John, New Brunswick, a major port city still smarting from the 1812 decision to set the provincial capital inland to Fredericton, so the Americans wouldn’t attack.

We left the quaint town of St. Andrews and the iconic Algonquin Hotel for the Fundy National Park where we are now. On the way, we stopped in to Saint John (not to be confused with St. John’s, Newfoundland, which according to the locals, abbreviates Saint.)

We found Saint John to be, well, a curious place.

The first human likenesses we encountered as we headed to the business district were uncommunicative.

The first human likenesses we encountered as we headed to the business district were uncommunicative.

Then, we saw a sofa coming up the street. Hey, are we in California or what?image

The moving sofa, trundling up a steep street, caused us to look for law enforcement. Keep in mind, we were only in Saint John for about 1 hour or so.

The moving sofa, trundling up a steep street, caused us to look for law enforcement. Keep in mind, we were only in Saint John for about 1 hour or so.

Ron found a local policemen to which we registered our concern about the weirdness in Saint John.

The Captain was no match for the sofa.

The Captain was no match for the sofa.

We exited Saint John in a hurry and headed to the tiny town of Alma, right on the Bay of Fundy.

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About Cheri

Writer, artist, cable television host, grandmother to four!
This entry was posted in Life, People and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to Faces of Lobster Country

  1. Richard says:

    Now you are Queen Cheri on her throne, you cann have as much fun as you like.

    Near us is the ancient village of Carshalton, now absorbed into the Great Metropolis and thus fulfilling its early promise: Cars-halt-on. The signs are good, therefore, for the Bay of Fundy.

  2. Christopher says:

    “…….The border guards let us into Canada after stiff questioning……”

    No doubt you come within the profile of Those who would enter Canada to seek to destroy Our Way Of Life, and take away All We Hold Dear.

    I, for one, am grateful that the dedicated men and women of the Canada Border Services Agency are doing what we, the hardworking Taxpayers, are paying them to do.

    • Richard says:

      Refugees are a global reponsibility, though, judging by the television news, the current crisis, anomalously, appears to comprise reasonably affluent, English-speaking younger people. Canada, as an advanced nation with global responsibilities might perhaps consider opening its borders to them.

      • Christopher says:

        I agree wholeheartedly.

        • Richard says:

          Angela Merkel has opened up Gernany’s borders substantially and called upon the rest of the EU to do the same. In the nine years to 2011, Germany’s net immigration was less than half that of the UK and in 2008 Germany had a net emigration of 50,000. The UK are currently processing 25,000 Syrian applications for asylum, roughly an equal share, with the number of other EU members, of the current total of Syrian refugees. A statistic often quoted is of immigration per head of existing population, but that rises with the lesser populations, which are usually sparser and in a greater land area.

          How do Canadian figures compare with these?

          • Christopher says:

            From what I’ve gleaned from the internet (I’m no longer a patron of the Popular Press), Canada has taken in 2,500 Syrian refugees, and 20,000 refugees from Iraq.

            There have been promises to take in 10,000 refugees from Syria over the next three years.

            All a mere drop in the bucket.

            But then, those who currently rule us in Canada are arguably even more right-wing than those who currently rule you in Britain. What more can I say?

            Although no longer a patron of the Popular Press, I feel obliged to dip into it every now-and-again to keep up-to-date with what it’s not telling its readers.

            In the matter of the refugees, what the Popular Press seems not to be telling its readers, is that there’d be no refugee crisis but for all the meddling over the last 25 years by (what I’ll diplomatically call) the “Western Powers”, in all the areas from where the refugees are now fleeing. Indeed, the “fingers” of the “Western Powers” – particularly that very large “Western Power” that dominates North America – have been everywhere.

            If “we”, the mass of denizens of the lands of the “Western Powers”, could be daily reminded of this, “we” would more completely know that it’s our governments who are the prime movers behind this terrible mess, and so are to blame. This would raise our level of consciousness about this matter, and a resolution of this crisis would flow from it.

            “We” would be made aware that re-settling the one million-or-so current and future refugees throughout the lands of the “Western Powers” (Europe and North America – total population 900 million) would not only be entirely feasible, but the right thing to do.

            As Colin Powell once said, “If you break it, you own it”.

            • Richard says:

              “………there’d be no refugee crisis but for all the meddling over the last 25 years by (what I’ll diplomatically call) the “Western Powers”, in all the areas from where the refugees are now fleeing…….”

              I was speaking specifically of Syrian refugees, the immediate causes of whom are the treatment by Assad of his own people and the brutalities of “Isil”. As to remoter causes, one needs to trace them back to biblical times.

              With reference to migration generally, there are figures that suggest this is more the function of rising global affluence than anything else.

              The UK is second only to the US in its financial support of Syrian refugee camps in Syrian border countries, and the only country worldwide to meet the international target for foreign aid as a proportion of GDP. These are two of the achievements of a centre-right government with moderate, compassionate, sound economic policies that – touch wood – seem to be working and, ironically, attracting economic migration. I am a subscriber to the pragmatic theory of truth of CS Peirce: if I may over-simplify, if it works, it’s true.

              • Christopher says:

                “……..The UK is second only to the US in its financial support of Syrian refugee camps……..”

                How does this translate into actual numbers? Well, the UK has given $1.7 billion for Syrian refugee camps. This represents about 0.13% of total UK government spending in any budgetary year

                However, between June 2014 and June 2015, the UK took in only 216 Syrian refugees.

                Don’t run away. Here’s more. On a per-capita basis, Britain’s record in taking in refugees is one of the worst in Europe,

                http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2015/09/daily-chart

                Take it or leave it………

              • Richard says:

                I am not accustomed to running away, particularly from the defence of my own country.

                Any fair assessment of the current situation is enlightening and I welcome it. If you care to read the link to the Guardian again, you will find that it its conclusions and qualifications are more cautious, moderate and favourable than you suggest. In particular, it warns against the kind of direct comparisons that you have made. Some of the dangers of doing so I have already alluded to.

                Bear in mind, also, that I have compared Britain only with Germany on figures from the Office for National Statistics, and that was difficult enough. It is impossible to be fair without examining the historical record and the circumstances and geography of the individual countries being treated. Britain’s historical record on refugees is long and honourable, while others are only just waking up to the problem. You examine only the past year.

                I thus neither take nor leave your remarks. Like the curate’s egg, they are good in parts. I admit to a bias in favour of my home. Do you have any prejudice you wish to admit to? Percentages can be misleading, but so can absolute numbers. I take no issue with you on the need for compassion and humanity, properly directed, and you are right to alert my conscience.

                Now perhaps you will answer my earlier question. How does Canada’s performance compare?

              • Richard says:

                I’m sorry, the link was to The Economist. I did realise that. The word just came out wrong. Few would accuse the Guardian of being fair and moderate these days.

              • Christopher says:

                “……How does Canada’s performance compare?……”

                Read again my earlier comment posted “September 4, 2015 at 10:05 pm” and you’ll see.

                Whether one interprets it as Canada doing better or worse in this matter than the UK, isn’t important. What’s important is that both countries have the resources to do much, much more, but aren’t.

              • Richard says:

                I merely requested you state the facts, Christopher. If you choose not to do so, that is entirely up to you.

              • Christopher says:

                “……I merely requested you state the facts, Christopher. If you choose not to do so, that is entirely up to you…….”

                And if you wish not to re-read what I’d already said in the comment that I alluded to, that is entirely up to you too.

              • Richard says:

                Ah well ! There it is.

                All my good wishes to you, Christopher.

              • Christopher says:

                Likewise.

    • wkkortas says:

      Hmph. Just wait until President Walker builds his wall.

    • Cheri says:

      The World Trade Center bombings (and the loss of 3000 people) changed our way of life and travel forever. I am grateful for all of those whose line of work continues to enforce the fragile rule of law that still governs Canada and the U.S. It may appear that the modern world is careening out of control and maybe it is, but the predictable tides ebbing and flowing comfort me. I am waiting for the Muslim world to rise up and eradicate the deadly cancers within what we in the West are told is a peaceful religion.

  3. wkkortas says:

    They had me at the kitty Buddha. New Brunswick, here I come.

  4. shoreacres says:

    Personally (and quite apart from you in the chair, which is entrancing), I like the trowel. Anyone could lay it on thicker and deeper with that, no matter what “it” they wanted to be digging up and spreading.

    The sofa reminds me of our art car parade — an annual event that brings out the weirdest and funniest in Houstonians. You can have a quick scan of the entries here.

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