A Daily Meditation courtesy of Sogyal Rinpoche

by cheri block

I’m reading The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche.

In the early chapters, he reminds us to meditate and shares his methods.

First, he asks you to bring your mind home.

Then, you are to release.

Last, you relax.

More specifically, Rinpoche writes, bringing your mind home means to turn your mind inward to the state of Calm Abiding.

Release means to release your mind from the prison of grasping, since you recognize that all pain and fear and distress arise from the craving and grasping mind.

Relax means to be spacious and relax the mind of its tensions.

Last, he shares a poem that inspires him when he meditates.

Rest in natural great peace

This exhausted mind

Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thought,

Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves

In the infinite ocean of samsara.

Indeed.

Advertisements

About Cheri

Writer, artist, cable television host, grandmother to four!
This entry was posted in Education, Life and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to A Daily Meditation courtesy of Sogyal Rinpoche

  1. Steve says:

    namaste

  2. May you all walk in balance. Aho

  3. Cyberquill says:

    The state of calm abiding? Now I know what CA stands for.

  4. Man of Roma says:

    It seems I violate ALL Sogyal Rinpoche’s rules.

  5. “Samsara” to wander, the wandering mind can be wonderful however I truly relax when I totally empty my mind: in that state, I’m not even there save for my body. The whole world can crash I won’t notice before I make up my mind to come back.

  6. Jeanie says:

    This is my favourite book. I dip in and out of it at will. To say that it has influenced my inner being is to say that I have been given wings; as well as an insight into life as I wish to live it.
    Jeanie

  7. Cheri says:

    It is from you that I learned of this book.
    Thank you for your gift.

    • Jeanie says:

      It makes me happy to know that you have found it through me and are now passing it on to others. Gifts, such as these, should be shared.
      Jeanie

  8. Man of Roma says:

    Mind emptying, I need quite a lot. It is a great thing I am starting to experience only bit by bit. Good for battery recharging. But I am not very good at that. I am pretty Western.

  9. sledpress says:

    Curiously, my first exposure to Yoga — when I was roughly ten years old — came in the form of books by Michael Volin, an Australian exponent of Tibetan Yoga, which constituted the local library’s entire Yoga collection. (In 1964 or 65 there was nothing like a Yoga class anywhere outside, say, Greenwich Village.) I devoured this stuff, but I have to say it was light on the subject of meditation, despite general exhortations to clear the mind. It may have been the Aussie factor. I never really “got” meditation in any form until much later.

    Subjective spaciousness is an idea that snaps right into place for me though. Bodies are spacious (one of the terrific books by second-generation Rolfer Jeffrey Maitland is called Spacious Body). Once the kind of release and relaxation you are talking about kick in, my experience is one of access to infinite, constantly transforming realities inside my own body — not Fantastic Voyage stuff but whole epic narratives (cast of thousands, timespan of generations) taking place in, oh say my left elbow. Tim Leary would have said this was DNA memory I suspect.

    I never remember them. Dammit.

  10. Man of Roma says:

    The poem is beautiful Chaeri, and I also loved:

    – bringing your mind home = turning your mind inward to the state of Calm Abiding.

    – release your mind from the prison of grasping

    – relax ie to be spacious and relax the mind of its tensions

    Day after tomorrow I start yoga for the first time in my life. The place is only a few yards from home. My daughter said: “It’s just round the corner, and I’ve heard is among the best you can find in Rome.”

    We will see. Definetly I need to stop those pounding waves.

    It is a pleasure to have met you Chaerie, we all believe that.

  11. Cheri says:

    Please let me know how yoga goes.
    We are thinking of doing the same thing!

  12. Man of Roma says:

    I will let you know, step by step if I can. What I like is that I can go there whenever I like. But the point is that – apart from what my daughter said, “papà, it’s a good place” but she knows what she’s saying usually – all the people that came out of there (I was waiting in the ante-room and asked them: “How is it? Are the positions difficult?”) kept saying:

    “Oh, it’s not difficult at all as far as the positions. But what most counts our mind gets ‘pulita’, clean from all the thoughts etc.”.

    So, calm abiding, and being free from the ‘grasping mind’ – I need that badly. Only as pauses though, since a grasping mind (or a mind ‘trying to grasp’ lol) to me is what makes me feel human, it is what Magister taught me, although one needs breaks from that, which is what I expect from Yoga. And thanks for your crystal, hyperborean reflections Chaerie. And yes, Manius is back, more badly behaved than ever 😉

    • Cheri says:

      Good! I’m glad you are back. I’m trying to unburden myself from so many unproductive thoughts AND write another long paper before I leave for Prague.
      Alas, I work so slowly. This time, I might not finish this paper.

  13. Man of Roma says:

    PS. And that is another kind of ‘grasping’ I do not dislike …
    😳
    😆 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆

  14. Man of Roma says:

    @Chaerie

    We are thinking of doing the same thing!

    It not seldom happens to us I wonder why 🙂

    @Sledpress

    It may have been the Aussie factor.

    LOLOHAH (laugh out loud ohhhhhhhhhhhh ah ah ah)

    Subjective spaciousness .. an idea that snaps right into place for me .. Bodies are spacious … once the kind of .. relaxation you are talking about kick in my experience is one of access to infinite, constantly transforming realities inside my own body … cast of thousands, timespan of generations taking place in

    You are BAD. You knew I’m after this type of multiple kosmos and reincarnations stuff 😉

    At any rate it is where Phythagoras meets the multiverse, which is one of the things I am desperately – without any mind calm – trying to grasp for Manius’ world(s). No kidding at all now.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s